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Teacher's Institute

From Immigrants to Citizens: Asian Pacific Americans in the Northwest
2014 NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture
Workshop for School Teachers

Seattle, WA
Session 1: July 14-19, 2014
Session 2: July 28-August 2, 2014

Please join us in the "Emerald City" and walk the footsteps of the earliest pioneers from Asia and the Pacific Islands!

This week-long, 2014 NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture summer institute will focus on the hidden histories of the Asian Pacific American pioneers, from the earliest Native Hawaiians who navigated the Pacific Coast and toiled for the Hudson Bay Trading Company in the early 1800s through the Chinese, Punjabi, Filipino and Japanese immigrant laborers who built the infrastructure of the major cities in this region.

Through experiences rooted in Seattle's Chinatown-International District, field trips to regional sites of historic and cultural significance, and presentations from a national faculty, NEH Summer Scholars will be able to construct a broad and inclusive perspective of the early American West that includes the economic and social contributions of Asian Pacific Americans. Teachers will have access to archival documents and first person narratives housed at the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience, and visit living cultural communities around the Pacific Northwest in order to understand how events and legislation of the 19th and 20th centuries continue to influence race and immigration issues today.

Please note: Visiting historic sites will require leisurely walks of up to 2 miles within a 90 minute timeframe, with some uphill walking. Participants should wear sturdy walking shoes and be at an adequate fitness level to enjoy these excursions.

Contact:
Charlene Mano Shen
Senior Community Programs Specialist
Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
719 S King St.
Seattle, WA 98104-3035
cmano-shen@wingluke.org
206/623-5124 ext 110

The Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience is located in Seattle's historic Chinatown-International District and its mission is to connect everyone to the rich history, dynamic cultures and art of Asian Pacific Americans through vivid storytelling and inspiring experiences.

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Program Overview

As a home base for our NEH 2014 Landmarks of American History and Culture Teacher Workshop, " From Immigrants to Citizens: Asian Pacific Americans in the Northwest," the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience in Seattle's Chinatown-International District will offer teachers an eye-opening experience and provide a framework for bringing the rich history of early Asian Pacific America into the classroom.

As NEH Summer Scholars, educators will be in the heart of Seattle's historic Chinatown-International District, a bustling neighborhood just south of Downtown and east of the Waterfront. Recognized as the only neighborhood in the nation where early Chinese, Japanese and Filipino American immigrants along with later arriving Vietnamese American refugees settled alongside one another, the region was designated as a Historic District and listed on the National Register in 1986.

The district and nearby communities contain many little-known preserved spaces, artwork, and historic sites that pay homage to the early immigrants and their contributions. NEH Summer Scholars will be able to visit such sites as Port Townsend, an historic seaport and entryway for Chinese in the early years; Port Gamble Historic District with its preserved bunkhouse that provided Chinese laborers working in the logging industry with segregated housing; and the Eagledale Ferry Dock, where Americans of Japanese ancestry and their immigrant parents departed from their homes during World War II on their way to incarceration centers.

Participants will also visit sites that are testaments to the successes and endurance of communities, such as the Panama Hotel and Jackson Building, two restored locations in historic Japantown that saw the rise and fall of Japanese American operated businesses; Bainbridge Island Filipino Community Hall, the first Filipino community hall built in Washington state; and the Gurudwara Singh Sabha of Washington, the focal point and place of worship for Sikh Americans in this area.

The NEH Summer Institute will also provide opportunities for inquiry and discussion with national faculty who have researched, taught, and written about these community histories and who are excited and committed to connect their research to the K-12 classroom These scholars have extensive experience working with archival materials and will be valuable resources on the Asian Pacific American experience, supported by archival documents and first person narratives housed at the Wing Luke Museum.

NEH Summer Scholars will finish the week-long institute with the tools to share the contributions and struggles of Asian Pacific American pioneers and its relevancy to contemporary issues in their own classrooms. More importantly, participants will be able to expand the classic narratives of American history to include the words, images and experiences of the early Hawaiian, Chinese, Punjabi, Japanese and Filipino laborers, linking history to the stories of their own students who may identify with these minority and immigrant communities and who may find themselves missing from the larger American narrative.

Please note: This workshop will focus on the time period from the mid-1800s through the mid-1940s. Due to time constraints the workshop will not cover Asian Pacific Americans who began to settle in the United States after World War II.

Contact Us

Contact:

Project Assistant Director

Vivian Chan

Community Programs Coordinator

Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience

vchan@wingluke.org

206/623-5124 ext 114

Project Director

Charlene Mano Shen

Senior Community Programs Specialist

Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience

cmano-shen@wingluke.org

206/623-5124 ext 110

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.



Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
719 S King Street
Seattle, WA 98104-3035

The Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience is located in Seattle's historic Chinatown-International District and its mission is to connect everyone to the rich history, dynamic cultures and art of Asian Pacific Americans through vivid storytelling and inspiring experiences.

STEP INTO A UNIQUELY AMERICAN STORY


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